Service Learning

Students and staff returned to volunteer at the non profit Last Chance Ranch Animal Rescue in Quakertown, PA in September. We helped the organization set up for their upcoming 20th annual Open House event, where the community can come to the ranch and learn about how they can help support the mission or consider more about adoption. We essentially assisted with unpacking and setting up the many outdoor tents needed for people and animals. Brad Wuerstle, our science teacher, has an affiliation with LCR since he adopted the…

Fall Is Here!

It might be 80 degrees outside, but the Fall weather is upon us and the colors are starting to change.  The time for crisp walks and warm drinks is approaching and that change is a natural part of our lives. Here are three ways to slow down and savor the season: 1. Focus on one thing at a time. Most of us are guilty of multitasking, but when our thoughts are focused on the ten other things we have to do, we lose the present moment—and miss out on small details that can improve…

Climate Awareness March

Sometimes service to the community takes the form of activism. On the 20th of September, we traveled to the river town of Lambertville NJ, where a climate strike was taking place. We marched through town and heard several very motivational speeches from local young people concerned with climate change and hoping to work together toward sustainability and political action. We marched with students from many different schools and walked out to the bridge over the Delaware River where a big banner was unfurled bearing the message that renewable energy can’t wait, that…

Replacing Detention with Meditation

Sometimes, we forget that school isn’t easy. For a student it can be extremely overwhelming. Think about it. They wake up early in the morning and spend their entire day learning new concepts and ideas that they might not be in the mindset to receive—from teachers they might not get along with, surrounded by peers who may be bullies. Add to that the external factors—home life, community and fitting in with friends—affecting their mood and focus. So, what happens in most schools? A child comes to school hungry, or tired, or just plain…

Greek Culture Night at Lotus

The Lotus School is hosting a Fall fundraiser on Friday, November 22nd, 7:00 – 9:00. This will be a family-friendly night of music, dancing, food and fun! Our longtime friend of the school Michael Venianakis is bringing us an evening of entertainment to celebrate Greek cultural heritage in the expression of cuisine, music, and dancing. Ticket prices are $20 for adults, $10 for students. Click on this link to purchase tickets online. The Marblehead Chowder House of Easton, PA will be…

Open House – October 10 2019

Are small schools better? Come to our Open House and find out! The Advantages Small Schools Can Provide Countless studies have shown the benefits that smaller schools, and smaller class sizes, can provide students. However, budget cuts in recent years have led to public schools becoming more overcrowded than ever before. In such times of overcrowding in public schools, small private schools can prove to be a great alternative for many families looking for a more intimate learning environment for their children. If you have not previously considered a small private school for your child(ren), here are a few of the advantages this learning environment can provide more than large public schools. More One-on-One Time The primary benefit of small schools is that they generally have a better teacher-to-student ratio, which ensures that students get the individualized attention that they need. Since teachers have fewer students, they can spend time working with students on an individual basis and ensure that they understand the material.  This one-on-one time means students get more feedback from their teachers on their work, which can help to ensure that each student’s needs are met and that they are provided with the best opportunities to grow as students and individuals. Individualized Curriculum In larger schools, teachers have to develop a generalized curriculum that meets the needs of a wide range of students. However, this has been shown to cause problems, as this standardized curriculum may be too fast, or too slow, for some students. When teachers have smaller class sizes, they can dedicate time to the needs of each student and can customize their curriculum to ensure each student is learning at a speed that is comfortable for them, and matches their learning style. Better Results Unsurprisingly, research has shown that schools with smaller class sizes, individualized curriculums, and ample one-on-one time consistently perform better than larger schools. The individualized education these students receive means that students in small schools tend to have better grades, perform better on university entrance exams, and more of these students go on to attend prestigious universities than their large school counterparts as a result of the unique education that they receive. A Sense of Community Small schools also tend to have a better sense of community than larger schools do. On these intimate campuses, faculty, staff, and students all know one another and develop strong relationships. This sense of family and community these schools foster helps students to feel more confident in the classroom, which allows them to grow comfortable sharing their ideas with their peers. Not only do students learn to speak up in class, but also, the strong bonds students develop with their teachers and peers at small schools can help them to develop strong relationship skills that will benefit them later in life. More parents than ever are rediscovering the benefits of sending their children to small schools. Small schools provide a unique, intimate learning environment that allows students to flourish, and that helps them to develop foundations that will give them the best chances of succeeding later in life. In fact, we have only touched upon a few of the advantages here that small schools provide. If you have a child who is about to start high school and are unsure where to send them, come to our Open House on Thursday, October 10 from 2pm to 5pm to learn more about the Lotus School.

Nockamixon State Park Mindfulness Hike

During our orientation week, the school community took a walk to Nockamixon State Park for a hike. This excursion sets an example of how the mindfulness practice at school can be applied outside of school. The students apply mindfulness when silently walking in an evenly paced line, keeping in mind their surroundings, their fellow students, and teachers. It is easy to get distracted by the world and by our own thoughts and feelings, but by reminding oneself to return to respectful community practices, we can see more of nature’s many…

what is mindfulness?

So what is mindfulness?

What Does Mindfulness Involve? Skills taught in mindfulness include: Observation — paying close attention to what is going on around you Description — being able to say what happened and how you felt in words Participation — becoming involved in an activity without being self-conscious about it Taking a Non-Judgmental Stance — accepting things as they are rather than judging them Focusing on One Thing in the Moment — without distraction from other ideas or events Effectiveness — doing what works rather than second-guessing yourself Mindfulness also involves recognizing when you are running on automatic pilot —…

Stress Management and Teens

from the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Teenagers, like adults, may experience stress every day and can benefit from learning stress management skills. Most teens experience more stress when they perceive a situation as dangerous, difficult, or painful and they do not have the resources to cope. Some sources of stress for teens include: School demands and frustrations Negative thoughts or feelings about themselves Changes in their bodies Problems with friends and/or peers at school Unsafe living environment/neighborhood Separation or divorce of parents Chronic illness or severe problems in the…

Back-to-School Tips

​​​The following tips are from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Making the First Day Easier Parents should remember that they need not wait until the first day of class to ask for help. Schools are open to address any concerns a parent or child might have, including the specific needs of a child, over the summer. The best time to get help might be one to two weeks before school opens. Many children become nervous about new situations, including changing to a new school, classroom or teacher. This may occur at any…